migrations

Adding HTTP request headers and authentication to remote JSON and XML in Drupal migrations

Submitted by dinarcon on Sun, 08/18/2019 - 23:00

In the previous two blog posts we learned to migrate data from JSON and XML files. We presented to configure the migrations to fetch remote files. In today's blog post, we will learn how to add HTTP request headers and authentication to the request. .

Migrating XML files into Drupal

Submitted by dinarcon on Sat, 08/17/2019 - 23:00

Today we will learn how to migrate content from a XML file into Drupal using the Migrate Plus module. We will show how to configure the migration to read files from the local file system and remote locations. We will also talk about the difference between two data parsers provided the module. The example includes node, images, and paragraphs migrations. Let’s get started.

Migrating CSV files into Drupal

Submitted by dinarcon on Thu, 08/15/2019 - 23:00

Today we will learn how to migrate content from a Comma-Separated Values (CSV) file into Drupal. We are going to use the latest version of the Migrate Source CSV module which depends on the third-party library `league/csv`. We will show how configure the source plugin to read files with or without a header row. We will also talk about a new feature that allows you to use stream wrappers to set the file location. Let’s get started.

Introduction to paragraphs migrations in Drupal

Submitted by dinarcon on Wed, 08/14/2019 - 23:00

Last updated on May 15, 2020.

Today we will present an introduction to paragraphs migrations in Drupal. The example consists of migrating paragraphs of one type, then connecting the migrated paragraphs to nodes. A separate image migration is included to demonstrate how they are different. At the end, we will talk about behavior that deletes paragraphs when the host entity is deleted. Let’s get started.

Migrating addresses into Drupal

Submitted by dinarcon on Tue, 08/13/2019 - 23:00

Today we will learn how to migrate addresses into Drupal. We are going to use the field provided by the Address module which depends on the third-party library `commerceguys/addressing`. When migrating addresses you need to be careful with the data that Drupal expects. The address components can change per country. The way to store those components also varies per country. These and other important consideration will be explained. Let’s get started.

Migrating dates into Drupal

Submitted by dinarcon on Mon, 08/12/2019 - 23:00

Today we will learn how to migrate dates into Drupal. Depending on your field type and configuration, there are various possible combinations. You can store a single date or a date range. You can store only the date component or also include the time. You might have timezones to take into account. Importing the node creation date requires a slightly different configuration. In addition to the examples, a list of things to consider when migrating dates is also presented.

Migrating users into Drupal - Part 2

Submitted by dinarcon on Sun, 08/11/2019 - 08:30

Today we complete the user migration example. In the previous post, we covered how to migrate email, timezone, username, password, and status. This time, we cover creation date, roles, and profile pictures. The source, destination, and dependencies configurations were explained already. Therefore, we are jumping straight to the process transformations in this entry.

Migrating users into Drupal - Part 1

Submitted by dinarcon on Sat, 08/10/2019 - 23:00

Today we are going to learn how to migrate users into Drupal. The example code will be explained in two blog posts. In this one, we cover the migration of email, timezone, username, password, and status. In the next one, we will cover creation date, roles, and profile pictures. Several techniques will be implemented to ensure that the migrated data is valid. For example, making sure that usernames are not duplicated.

Migrating taxonomy terms and multivalue fields into Drupal

Submitted by dinarcon on Fri, 08/09/2019 - 22:30

Today we continue the conversation about migration dependencies with a hierarchical taxonomy terms example. Along the way, we will present the process and syntax for migrating into multivalue fields. The example consists of two separate migrations. One to import taxonomy terms accounting for term hierarchy. And another to import into a multivalue taxonomy term field. Following this approach, any node and taxonomy term created by the migration process will be removed from the system upon rollback.