Using Drupal blocks to enrich your website's content

Submitted by dinarcon on Fri, 07/26/2019 - 16:00

We have already talked about nodes, content types, and fields. In Drupal, they often comprise the main content of a page. Very likely you will want to display extra information along the page. This can be accomplished using containers called blocks. For example, the main content of a page can be a news article and a block can be used to display a list of other articles written by the same author. You could also use a block to show a search box or copyright text. Let’s explore what Drupal blocks have to offer.

The versatility of Drupal fields

Submitted by dinarcon on Thu, 07/25/2019 - 07:00

After understanding the difference between nodes and content types, let’s learn a new concept. Fields are Drupal's atomic data storage mechanism. They allow you to save discrete pieces of information which can be used for displaying, filtering, and sorting purposes.. Fields can be attached to nodes, users, taxonomy terms, blocks, and other Drupal entities. It is possible to share a field among bundles of the same entity. For example, you can share an image field among different content types (bundles) of the content (node) entity.

What is the difference between a node and a content type in Drupal?

Submitted by dinarcon on Mon, 04/01/2019 - 07:00
Node and content type are arguably the two most common concepts that we hear when starting to learn Drupal. Sometimes they are used interchangeably, but they represent different concepts. Let's learn the difference and how they relate to one another. We are going to learn attributes that all nodes share, how content types can provide default values, and how content types serves as templates to collect different kinds of information.